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Office Location

177 Huntington Avenue
9th floor
Boston, MA 02115

Biography

Elizabeth Stowell is a PhD student in the Personal Health Informatics program at Northeastern University’s College of Computer and Information Science and Bouvé College of Health Sciences and is advised by Professor Andrea Parker. She earned a bachelor’s degree from Wellesley College in health and society. Much of the coursework in this major was in the Women’s and Gender Studies Department and approached public health issues through an intersectional feminist lens.

Currently, Elizabeth is a member of the Wellness Technology Laboratory. Elizabeth’s research focus centers on expanding access to and improving the quality of healthcare in the United States as well as globally. Elizabeth has a particular interest in addressing health disparities in sexual and reproductive health and in mental health.

Education

  • BA in Health and Society, Wellesley College

About Me

  • Hometown: Massachusetts
  • Field of Study: Personal Health Informatics
  • PhD Advisor: Andrea Parker

What are the specifics of your graduate education (thus far)?

The Personal Health Informatics program is an interdisciplinary program in the College of Computer and Information Science and the Bouvé College of Health Sciences. The program focuses on consumer-facing and patient-facing health systems. I have taken courses in topics including research methods, social-epidemiology, human-computer interaction, health behavior theory, and mobile application development.

What are your research interests?

My primary research focus centers on expanding access to and improving the quality of health care in the United States as well as globally. I am particularly interested in sexual and reproductive health, and empowering people to make informed decisions about their own health.

What’s one problem you’d like to solve with your research/work?

I am currently working on using technology to address disparities in sexual health and to confront racial and gender bias in how we approach these disparities.