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Eli Goldner

PhD Student

Contact

Office Location

440 Huntington Avenue
308 West Village H
Boston, MA 02115

Biography

Eli Goldner is a PhD student at Northeastern’s College of Computer and Information Science focusing on programming languages, advised by Professor Dr. Olin Shivers. He is from Manchester, NH. Goldner earned his BA in Mathematics and Computer Science from Brandeis University.

Goldner’s interest in programming languages comes from his desire to apply category theory and logic to programming. He seeks to find novel techniques which can develop and verify the correctness of programs without sacrificing efficiency or generality. He loves when problems can be solved by gradually transforming them from one kind to another and, step by step, they incrementally become more negotiable and clearer – then transferring the techniques he learned to approach other problems.

Long term, Goldner would like to develop technologies and means of reasoning that help the average programmer write trustworthy, efficient, and maintainable code in academic and industrial environments.

Education

  • BA in Mathematics and Computer Science, Brandeis University

About Me

  • Hometown: Manchester, NH
  • Field of Study: Programming Languages
  • PhD Advisor: Olin Shivers

What are the specifics of your graduate education (thus far)?

I am a first year PhD student at Northeastern CCIS interested in the theory and design of programming languages.

What are your research interests in a bit more detail? Is your current academic/research path what you always had in mind for yourself, or has it evolved somewhat? If so, how/why?

I came to realize I was interested in programming languages “from the wrong direction”. In my later time as an undergrad at Brandeis I thought I wanted to do research in category theory or logic. When I realized both of those and a host of other interesting mathematics had practical and beautiful applications when it came to reasoning about programs I became more and more interested. By the fall semester of my senior year I was applying to computer science grad schools to do work in programming languages.

What’s one problem you’d like to solve with your research/work?

I want to find novel techniques which can help develop and verify the correctness of programs, without sacrificing efficiency or generality.

What aspect of what you do is most interesting/fascinating to you? What aspects of your research (findings, angles, problems you’re solving) might surprise others?

I love it when problems can be solved by gradually transforming them from one kind of problem to another, and step by step they incrementally become more negotiable and clear. And then looking at how that evolving chain of transformations accomplished what it did, I try to generalize and transfer that approach to other problems.

What are your research/career goals, going forward?

I want to develop technologies and means of reasoning that help the working programmer write trustworthy, efficient, and maintainable code. I am interested in doing this in both academic and industry environments.