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Algorithms and theory research at CCIS seeks to answer one of the most basic question faced in computer science: Which problems can computers solve efficiently? CCIS aims to find out with rigorous, state-of-the-art research that tackles fundamental algorithm problems with solutions that improve Internet security, data privacy, and network efficiency.

Areas of investigation:

  • Approximation algorithms
  • Computational complexity
  • Cryptography
  • Distributed computing
  • Privacy
  • Learning theory
  • Network algorithms

The CCIS algorithms and theory group is well known for research in cryptography, privacy network optimization, and pseudorandomness. Our faculty works in both the core foundations of computing and in computing applications—making for a broad research environment. Students and faculty collaborate closely, forming an especially cohesive community that offers internal seminars, reading groups, recruiting meetings, and social events.

Notable achievements:

  • CCIS has been awarded a National Science Foundation grant to design algorithms to more efficiently and reliably identify bugs in software and hardware systems such as cell phones, medical devices, and aviation systems.
  • Our researchers constructed robust, efficient cryptographic protocols and pseudo-random generators.
  • CCIS researchers developed widely used ranking and search algorithms for online documents.
  • Our team created protocols that enable individual network nodes to cooperate and optimize for global objectives in adversarial environments.
  • CCIS researchers developed an algorithm for a model explaining the emergence of scale-free networks in natural, technological, and social systems.
Research Area - Algorithms & Theory